Trump’s Tax Reform: Can It Really Become Law?

Just so you know, it requires a great deal of restraint on my part to keep from writing about my political opinions here on the blog, especially about our new president and the chaotic events that seem to occur almost every day down in Washington, DC. My wife has reminded me that my readers here at Super Saving Tips aren’t looking for that sort of thing, and that you the readers are more likely to peruse the New York Times or Washington Post if you want political fodder. But wonder of wonders, I finally do have a little something to say that actually involves your personal finances and politics. So hopefully you’ll be interested this time around. It’s about…tax reform!

Trump has proposed some broad changes to our tax code, the biggest tax reform since the 1980's. But can it really become law? Here's why it isn't likely.

Trump’s Proposed Tax Reform

Our new president has presented the first trickles of information about his plans to reform the tax code and fulfill his campaign promise to review and change the federal tax laws. He and his Treasury Secretary, Steve Mnuchin, say it will be the biggest tax cut ever (fact check: actually it will be the biggest cut since the 1980’s and Ronald Reagan). Now normally when you talk about cutting taxes, that’s a pretty popular idea out there among the constituents. Continue reading

Deep in the Heart of TAXES

Benjamin Franklin once said “In this world, nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes”. Particularly here in the USA, you certainly can’t deny that, can you? You can’t really ever avoid the subject of taxes, especially right around now since the big and dreaded April 15th deadline (ok, this year it’s April 18th) is less than a month away! The truth however is this: income taxes are not the only taxes we have to deal with every day, and retirement and taxes is something we need to plan for. It’s not something that is new and it’s not something that is going away.

Taxes are an inevitable part of life, but when you mix retirement and taxes you know you need to do some planning. Here are some tax situations to consider.

The net is this: my paycheck is gross!

Back in the days when I used to get an actual paycheck, the first thing I would look at was the “net” amount of my check compared to the “gross”. There was always a big difference between those two numbers and most of it was centered on taxes. It always amazed me how many different ways they could slice up my paycheck and no matter what my salary was that number was always smashed by those payroll tax deductions. Continue reading

Income Tax Time – Do It Yourself or Tax Pro?

Please note this post contains affiliate links which help to fund this blog at no cost to you. Thanks for your support!

It’s now income tax season and (hopefully) you are gathering all of your tax information and planning to file your return over the next couple months, certainly by the April 18th, 2017 deadline. Yes, you have a couple of extra days this year because the 15th is a Saturday and the 17th is a Washington, DC holiday this year.

It's time to get those income tax returns rolling. Are you going to hire a tax pro or DIY with online tools and software? Here's how to decide.

But once you’ve gathered your information, how are you planning to prepare your returns? Are you planning to do it yourself, or will you hire a tax professional to help? Continue reading

Strategies to Avoid the Dreaded Tax Audit

If you’re anything like me, you sometimes think about the possibility of a tax audit and wonder what you can do to make sure that never happens. Truthfully, tax audits are pretty rare, only about 1% actually ever get audited. They mostly occur with wealthy people (audited at 2.5%) and questionable returns with itemized deductions that may net the IRS some substantial amount of money.  There also audit some small number of totally random returns as well. Those that earn less than $200,000 (audited at about 0.7%) and file as individuals or joint earners stand the very least chance of an audit even though the numbers are increasing ever so slightly since 2008.

Strategies to Avoid the Dreaded Tax Audit Continue reading

33 Most Overlooked Tax Deductions You Need to Know

Billions of dollars are left behind every year by people who prepare their own taxes, often because they fail to take advantage of all the tax deductions available to them. While I believe that most of us can do our own taxes and not leave our money on the table, it’s imperative to prepare now for the tax return deadline which is April 18th this year (the 15th is a Friday and this year’s deadline has been extended to Monday the 18th). In Maine and Massachusetts it’s the 19th due to Patriots day.

33 Most Overlooked Tax Deductions You Need to Know

To help you with your 2015 tax returns, don’t skip this important list.  While I’m not a tax professional, you can always research these and other tax deductions at IRS.gov. Remember, if you have difficulty or your return is more complex than you can handle, see an accountant or check out the many free options either online or in your own community. Continue reading

How Will the Presidential Election Affect Your Financial Future?

You can’t get through a day right now without hearing something about the presidential election and the Democratic and Republican campaigning that is going on. Between the news, talk shows, debate stages, and the constant updating and interviewing of the huge number of candidates wanting your vote, it’s just inescapable isn’t it?

How Will the Presidential Election Affect Your Financial Future?

How much attention do you pay to it all? Have you taken a look at what each candidate says and stands for? That may have a huge impact on your life, money, and your financial future. Here are some of the big issues that are being talked about that you should consider and may very well influence your choice when you vote in your state primary/caucus and of course next November when you have the chance to vote for President. Continue reading

10 Year End Tax Planning Moves to Save Money

It’s that time again to examine the moves you need to make to increase your net income and save on your tax bill for 2015 and beyond. It’s really important to start now and review all the opportunities that can save you money, since in most cases (for personal taxes, not business), December 31st is the deadline for adjustments. Doing your year end tax planning now means you can claim these benefits when you file your return by April 15th. If you itemize your deductions, many of these actions should look familiar, so let’s begin!

10 Year End Tax Planning Moves to Save Money
Continue reading

Save by Challenging Your Property Tax Assessment

Here where I live in New Jersey, we have the highest real estate taxes in the United States (and probably the universe as well!) with a whopping average of $3,971 per year. Now that we’re closing in on a new fiscal year in my town, and my first quarterly tax payment is due on August 1st, I am reminded again that many of us simply accept the tax evaluations we receive from our local assessor and pay up without really knowing what can be done. In fact, if there has been some kind of error made or even if you just need a further explanation as to how the assessment was calculated, there’s a lot you can do.

Save by Challenging Your Property Tax Assessment

It matters not whether you pay your taxes through an escrow account (which I don’t recommend if you have that choice) or you do as I do and pay them directly to your local office, you still have the right to challenge your assessment and you may in fact have good reasons to do exactly that! Continue reading

10 and a Half Things to Do for Year End Tax Planning

Since saving money is my “mantra” as well as the purpose of this blog, let’s examine some ways you can increase your net income and save on your tax bill for 2014 and beyond. It’s really important to start now to review all the opportunities for saving money, since in most cases (for non-business), December 31st is the deadline for adjustments that you will report by tax day next April. If you itemize your deductions, many of these listed should be familiar.

Year End Tax Planning

 

Continue reading